SQL Server

Digging Around For Free Tools – Google Code

Digging Around In Google Code

Google Code was very thin when it comes to SQL Server. I did find a few of interesting projects that may appeal to others as well as me. I will say there was a TON of use SQL Server with x programming language.

Project RoundhousE

“Professional Database Versioning and Change Management”

RoundhousE is an automated database deployment (change management) system that allows you to use your current idioms and gain much more.

It seeks to solve both maintenance concerns and ease of deployment. We follow some of the same idioms as other database management systems (SQL More >

Digging Around For Free Tools – BitBucket

Digging Around In BitBucket

BitBucket was very thin when it comes to SQL Server. I did find a couple of interesting projects that may appeal to others as well as me.

BonSQL

Turn any version of Microsoft SQL Server into a platform capable of acting just like MongoDB – only you get transactions and the ability to join with traditional relational data as well!

This is a nice example of using newer methods with our good ol’ SQL Server engine.

DeploySQL

Scripts to auto-deploy SQL from SQL Server and to dump database objects to disk (so they can be searched or committed to source control).

There More >

Digging Around For Free Tools – SQL Server

Tool Archaeology, Digging Through The Web

About every three to six months I will burn some time and just go digging for tools. Mostly, I’m looking for stuff related to SQL Server, PowerShell or C# development. There are lots of places to search through that could yield your next life saving tool. All the major sites have a search feature but if you just put in SQL Server you will get a ton of hits that don’t have anything to do with SQL Server. I usually do something like “SQL Server” NOT MySQL NOT Postgresql NOT DB2 NOT Oracle to keep the other databases from cluttering up the results. The More >

Finding SQL Server Installs Using Powershell

Old Dog, New Tricks

I’ve been writing tools for SQL Server for a lot of years. Some of these tools were never completely released. Some of them were just for me. Some of them overlapped other tools already on the market and free for all. Recently, I started updating my bag of tricks and tools. This seemed like a great time to get back into PowerShell. I decided to pull out a bit of C# code I cobbled together nine years ago as part of a tool to find SQL Server instances on a network. I never really got around to making it a “production” ready tool since there was already a most excellent one More >

Changing Directions

I See Dead Tech….

Knowing when a technology is dying is always a good skill to have. Like most of my generation we weren’t the first on the computer scene but lived through several of it’s more painful transitions. As a college student I was forced to learn antiquated technologies and languages. I had to take a semester of COBOL. I also had to take two years of assembler for the IBM 390 mainframe and another year of assembler for the x86 focused on the i386 when the Pentium was already on the market. Again and again I’ve been forced to invest time in dying technologies. Well not any More >

SQLDIY: Alert On Blocking Chains

Continuing the SQLDIY monitoring project we will take a look at tracking blocking events. I actually received a request to update this from a script I had made available at SQLServerCentral. This was a script from the grand old days of SQL Server 2000 and actually used xp_smtp_sendmail That Gert Drapers wrote about a million years ago in SQL Server time. With the advent of database mail it only made sense to update the procedure to use it. This still relies on sysprocesses but since it isn’t deprecated yet I’ve got at least three versions of SQL Server before I need to fix that. I did replace More >

SQLDIY: Gather Virtual File Statistics Using T-SQL #TSQL2sDay 15

It’s that time again, T-SQL Tuesday is here! This time Pat Wright (blog|twitter) is hosting and has put forth automating tasks using ether T-SQL or Powershell. I LOVE automating stuff. As a production DBA in some very large shops you can’t do your job unless you make your servers work for you. I’ve been using T-SQL and *GASP* xp_cmdshell, OSQL and file shares to gather stats and push configurations to servers for decades. Log before fancy things like C# and Powershell existed. These days I use a variety of home grown tools but doing things with just T-SQL can be just as powerful. I’m going More >

Sometimes, you have to fix it yourself

The Problem

SQL Server is a huge product with lots of moving parts. Bugs happen. Microsoft has a place to voice your issues or problems. They allow you to vote on the issue and then decide when or if it will get fixed. I’ve used Connect when I hit a bug and I have voted on items that were important to me. Recently I hit a bug in sp_createstats. I use this system stored procedure generate statistics in an automated process I’ve got that manages statistics. I added a new vendor database to the system and on the first run hit “Column ‘DAYSOPEN’ in table ‘dbo.TBL_OPPORTUNITY’ cannot be used in an More >

Quick Tip Of The Day

Over and over again we are told that the DMV’s only hold data since your last reboot. So, how do you know when your server was last rebooted? Well, every time your SQL Server service restarts tempdb is recreated every time. With a quick query to sys.databases we can get the creation date of tempdb! Armed with that little nugget you can then analyze what is in the DMV’s relevant to the last system restart.

SELECT

create_date AS last_restart_time

FROM

sys.databases

WHERE name = 'tempdb'

Adventures in SQL CLR and C#

I’ve toyed with the CLR in SQL Sever 2005 off and on since the first Yukon beta had it enabled. And I’ll be honest with you, I was not a fan.It wasn’t like “YOU got chocolate in my peanut butter!” kind of moment for me. I really thought it was going to be a disaster of biblical proportions. As SQL Server DBA’s we caught a break, adoption wasn’t exactly stellar. The problem was there are enough restrictions and little gotchas to keep developers from whole sale abandoning Transact SQL for something more familiar. Fast forward a few years and now I’m not so scared.My biggest worry back then was More >

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