Fusion-IO

Solid State Storage: Enterprise State Of Affairs

Here In A Flash!

Its been a crazy last few years in the flash storage space. Things really started taking off around 2006 when NAND flash and moores law got together. in 2010 it was clear that flash storage was going to be a major part of your storage makeup in the future. It may not be NAND flash specifically though. It will be some kind of memory and not spinning disks.

Breaking The Cost Barrier.

For the last few years, I’ve always told people to price out on the cost of IO not the cost of storage. Buying flash storage was mainly a niche product solving a niche problem like to speed up More >

Changing Directions

I See Dead Tech….

Knowing when a technology is dying is always a good skill to have. Like most of my generation we weren’t the first on the computer scene but lived through several of it’s more painful transitions. As a college student I was forced to learn antiquated technologies and languages. I had to take a semester of COBOL. I also had to take two years of assembler for the IBM 390 mainframe and another year of assembler for the x86 focused on the i386 when the Pentium was already on the market. Again and again I’ve been forced to invest time in dying technologies. Well not any More >

Fusion-io, Flash NAND All You Can Eat

Fusion-io has announced general availability of the new Octal. This card is the largest single flash based device I’ve ever seen. The SLC version has 2.56 terabytes of raw storage and the MLC has a whopping 5.12 terabytes of raw storage.  This thing is a behemoth. The throughput numbers are also impressive, both read at 6.2 Gigabytes a second using a 64KB block, you know the same size as an extent in SQL Server. They also put up impressive write numbers the SLC version doing 6 Gigabytes a second and the MCL clocks in at 4.4 Gigabytes a second.

There is a market for these drives but you really More >

SATA, SAS or Neither? SSD’s Get A Third Option

I recently wrote about solid state storage and its different form factor. Well, several major manufacturers have realized that solid state needs all the bandwidth it can get. Dell, IBM, EMC, Fujitsu and Intel have formed the SSD Form Factor Working Group bringing PCIe 3 to the same form factor that SATA and SAS use. Focusing on the same connector types and a 2.5” dive housing. I’m not sure how quickly it will make it’s way into the enterprise space but that is clearly it’s target. Reusing the physical form factor cuts down on manufacturing and R&D costs for all involved. They have an More >

Fusion-io, What It Takes To Be On The Cutting Edge

 

I recently had the privilege to talk with David Flynn, former CTO, Founder and newly minted CEO about Fusion-io. How Fusion-io was born. What they have built and the future of the company. Fusion-io is a new comer to the enterprise storage space and has exited the gates in a flash. In the last two years they have shown up with some impressive hardware, managed to draw Steve Wozniak into the fold and show some explosive growth, touting IBM, DELL and HP as adopters of the ioDrive.

Fusion-io is in its 4th year now, employing around 250 people. The first two years they were in design and build More >

Fusion-IO releases new 2.1 driver and firmware

And it is well worth the upgrade. I recently had the opportunity to interview David Flynn CEO of Fusion-IO and that will be coming up soon. I have been beta testing the 2.0 driver for quite some time and have been very happy with the performance and reduction in required system memory (by half!). The 2.1 driver is the official release of the 2.x series and has some gains even over the 2.0 drive I’ve been testing. I always to a little test run with HD Tach before diving into my other more detailed tools and right off the top the 2.1 driver is faster yet again than the 1.27 and the 2.0 driver. More >

It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Christmas……

 

We got something good in the mail last week!

 

 

Some quick observations:

The build quality is outstanding. Nothing cheap at all about this card. The engineering that has gone into this shows in every way.

It is made up of modules that are screwed down, I can see where they really thought this through so each rev of the card doesn’t require all new PCB’s to be manufactured.

It does require an external source of power via 4 pin Molex or SATA power connector period. Make sure your server has one available, even though these are sold by HP not all HP servers have the required More >

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