Digging Around In Google Code

Google Code was very thin when it comes to SQL Server. I did find a few of interesting projects that may appeal to others as well as me. I will say there was a TON of use SQL Server with x programming language.

Project RoundhousE

“Professional Database Versioning and Change Management”

RoundhousE is an automated database deployment (change management) system that allows you to use your current idioms and gain much more.

It seeks to solve both maintenance concerns and ease of deployment. We follow some of the same idioms as other database management systems (SQL scripts), but we are different in that we think about future maintenance concerns. We want to always apply certain scripts (anything stateless like functions, views, stored procedures, and permissions), so we don’t have to throw everything into our change scripts. This seeks to solves future source control concerns. How sweet is it when you can version the database according to your current source control version?

This was probably the most well rounded project I’ve seen on any of the open source repository sites. It was also one of the most complete versioning and change management solutions as well. I also have seen it on one of the other repository sites but this one seemed more up to date.

NCrontab

This article shows how to use NCrontab to generate occurrences of a crontab-style schedule as a table in SQL Server (2005 or later), which can then be used in queries and especially joins to do interesting things.

This is a solid example of using the CLR for something other than regex. Documentation isn’t horrible and it is unique bit of kit.

dbrefactor

C# library for versioning and refactoring database structure using Microsoft SQL Server

I picked this one because it was a good idea but has been abandoned. This is one of those projects that could be revived by the right developer. Refactoring SQL Server schema and code can be a complete pain in the ass and any tool that makes that better is worth looking at, even if it has aged a bit.

 

Next up:

SourceForge